Home
Jitterbug 1 Contents
Jitterbug 2 Contents
Lindy 1 Contents   
Lindy 2 Contents
Lindy 3 Contents
West Coast Swing 1
Polish-Amer. Polka 1
Salsa 1 Contents
Balboa Contents
Argentine Tango 1
Argentine Tango 2
Argentine Tango 3
Argentine Tango 4
FAQ - Info New Account Email Us Internet
Video Primer

FAQ

What's inside a dance subscription area?
How does one register?
How many dance choices are there?
How much does it cost?
What software does one need?
How long do the videos take to download?
Do I have to download the video each time I wish to view it?
What are the lengths of the videos?
Why Apple Quicktime?
Will my computer be able to handle the video?
Can the videos be saved to disk (to one's own computer?)
Can videos be saved to one's own computer with the free version of Quicktime?
What is the advantage of saving the videos as files on my computer?
Is there a downside to saving the videos?

What's inside a dance subscription area?
Pages with Short videos, still photographs and text. The videos have accompanying music.
How does one register?
To access the registration process, you need a username and password which can be entered on the DanceTutor homepage. Thereafter, when logging in with the username and password, you will be prompted "Click here to add a dance class(es)"
How many dance choices are there?
At present, there are sixteen (16) choices, Swing 1 (Beginning/Intermediate Jitterbug) and Swing 2 (Intermediate/Advanced Jitterbug), Argentine Tango 1, 2, 3, 4, Argentine Tango Waltz 1, Lindy Hop 1, 2 & 3, West Coast Swing 1, Balboa (also called Bal-Swing), Salsa 1 & 2 and Polish-American Polka 1 & 2.
How much does it cost?
$7 for one month, $9 for two months. A month equals a one month plus 3 days (e.g. October 12 to November 15).

What software does one need?

If you don't already have it, you'll need Apple QuickTime 5.02 or higher which is free at Apple's website. As well, Quicktime has a Pro version ($30) for which the only two advantages to the non-developer are that it allows for easy saving of videos and it does not have a "nag screen" prompting the user to buy the pro version.

How long do the videos take to download?

Those with high speed access will have nearly no wait while the video downloads unless their browser has certain security features "on" which will not allow the video to play until entirely downloaded causing about a 30 second wait (The Mozilla browser has this feature "on" as a default, Internet Explorer does not. Sorry we are no savvy about this feature at the moment and can give no guidance other than that it exists). Those with dial-up connections (most people at the moment) will wait from 2 to 5 minutes.

Do I have to download the video each time I wish to view it?

If you don't leave the page, the video can be played over and over at regular speed, slow motion, starting in the middle, whatever. Once the browser page containing the video is left, then upon coming back to the page most users will not have to download again because the video is stored in a temporary internet folder (as is true of every file after loading to a browser page). UPDATE: The Mozilla browser has a default security feature which blocks the Quicktime video files from being saved in the cache file. Presumably, Internet Explorer may well have the same feature but it is not "on" as the default setting.

What are the lengths of the videos?

Most of the videos are from 6 to 20 seconds, with an average about 12 seconds. Most sections have longer demonstration videos.

Why include the same Chapter 4 in both Swing 1 and Swing 2?

Because the moves are for both intermediate and advanced dancers and we wouldn't want someone taking just Swing 2 to miss them. In the same way, the exercises chapter is included in both Argentine Tango 1 and 2. The exercises are equally relevant to beginning and more experienced dancers.

Why Apple Quicktime?

Quicktime runs on both windows and Apple systems, it plays the best-looking video on the internet AND it allows for smooth slow-motion playback, an element that can't be missing when learning dance from video.

Will my computer be able to handle the video?

If you purchased your computer new after 2000, your chances are good. At least a 233 CPU (central processing unit) is needed for a passable result. Test the sample video on the Home Page -- download it, play it again and again, and play it frame-by-frame (slow-motion) by clicking the "forward button". Each video has an option to be played either twice or four times as large. It would take a more powerful computer to successful play such enlarged videos. But the unenlarged videos are playable on almost all of the machines today.

How can videos be saved to disk (to one's own computer) using the Pro version of Quicktime ($30)?

Just click the bottom right button and on a drop down menu you will see an option "save to disk" (this feature is only on the Pro version). For now, DanceTutor is not impeding the saving of movies. This saves considerable waiting later in that a video file already on the viewer's computer plays almost instantly, while a video called over the internet -- say 500K in size -- takes perhaps 2 to 3 minutes to download before it can be played. As mentioned, once downloaded, a video can be played over and over again and even saved. See the next question if you have the free version of Quicktime.

Can videos be saved to one's own computer with the free version of Quicktime?

[Update: starting with the new Quicktime 7 Standard ("free") version, Quicktime videos saved on your computer are not viewable. On Quicktime 7 and above, only the paid versions ("Pro", $30) permits the saving of viewable videos. What follows below would apply to pre-Quicktime 7 versions.]

Yes. The videos on this site are downloaded, not streamed. If they were streamed, you would see the video once and poof, it's gone -- no slow motion, no replay, gone. Downloaded videos are received in the user's computer and the question for saving them is "where are they"? Windows 98: The answer for Windows 98 users is that they are in a subfolder of the windows folder called temporary internet files (windows/temporary internet files). This is where internet pages, graphics and movies are temporarily stored. Go to the end of the temporary internet files subfolder and you'll see a file with a .mov suffix (e.g. s4b.mov). That's it. You will have to move that file to another folder. Otherwise it will be deleted when the temporary internet files folder fills up (first in, first out). Other operating systems and Apple MacIntosh computers must have a similar thing, and we will have to find that out. (Note: Many folks refer to downloaded videos as being streamed also, or as progressive streaming. We do not. Rest assured for the purposes here that if you viewed a video from the DanceTutor site, it resides on your computer)

Windows XP Well, time doesn't stand still and now there are later operating systems, one of them Windows XP. A customer was nice enough to send us the following:

"How to view or save Quicktime movies using Windows XP"

1. If you don't see the option to save the file to your hard drive, use this workaround:

2. Open your Control Panel and double-click the QuickTime icon. Set the pull-down menu to "Browser plug-in" and place a checkmark next to "Save movies in disc cache." Close the QuickTime settings menu.

3. From now on, every QuickTime movie you watch will be stored in your Temporary Internet folder until it's written over with new data. [DanceTutor Editor: We believe that "Save movies in disc cache" is checked by default. Then 1, 2, and 3 can be skipped, and you would start with number 4 below]

4. Here's how to retrieve a QuickTime movie from your Temporary Internet folder:

Open Internet Explorer.
Click on Tools and then Internet Options.
Click the General tab and then Settings under Temporary Internet Folder.
Click the View Files button.
Sort the list by "Last Accessed." The QuickTime movie should be at the top (or bottom) of the list.
Drag and drop the movie to your desktop.
Our many thanks to the dancer in Hayward, California, for his help. DanceTutor has one very part-time staff member and we appreciate all the help with this stuff.

What is the advantage of saving the videos as files on my computer?

Time. Should you want to view the clip later in the week or whenever, a video file called from your computer plays almost instantly, while it takes a few minutes to download it again from the internet.

Is there a downside to saving the videos?

Potentially, depending on the amount of disk space available on your computer. The files are about 300K to 2M on average, and a number of them could take up a lot of computer space. If a computer becomes overcrowded, it's performance will suffer, and if that happens it will be necessary to delete the files to get the space back. To our knowledge (though we're not computer engineers), overcrowding a hard disk does not cause damage but causes performance to suffer.

See also the Internet Video Primer and 'Things-that-could-go-wrong-with-Internet-Video' page

Home Swing 1 Contents
Swing 2 Contents
Argentine Tango 1
Argentine Tango 2
FAQ - Info New Account Email Us Internet
Video Primer